Why I love the outback 

The outback is hot. It’s dusty. There’s nobody there. It’s boring. I hear it all the time from fellow backpackers. They bemoan long dull drives across the Nullarbor, and endless days spent on the Stuart highway. They talk about the incessant red dirt, the copious amount of flies, the flat barren landscape. And I understand their complaints. The outback isn’t for everybody. But in my opinion experiencing the outback is one of the best ways to truly understand the Australian spirit-the stubborn determination, the sense of humour, the camaraderie. 
We had only just begun our journey up the Oodnadatta track when the political activism of the area became clear. I’ve often heard it argued that the outback is a perfect place for nuclear testing and dumping of nuclear waste because “there’s no one there” (and it’s certainly been used that way in the past). But here we were in the outback seeing graffiti condemning uranium mining in Roxby Downs, protesting against the idea of nuclear power being introduced in Australia, and clearly crying out against the idea that there is no one in the outback who could be affected by nuclear activity. I have to be honest-I don’t know enough about nuclear energy to have a clear opinion on it. But I was immediately hit by the fact that central Australia is a place with a deep history-decades of revolting against mining, nuclear testing, and US military presence show an underlying love of the land and a sense of community even in a space so vast. 


The infrastructure of the outback never fails to amaze me. Things that we take for granted now-like being able to drive across the country-are only available to us because of the hard work of so many Australians. We met a couple who worked on bitumening the Nullarbor. They told us about living in their car with a small baby, carting all their things across the unforgiving landscape on the then unsealed bumpy highway. We marvelled at stories of the old Ghan railway, of the passengers disembarking in Oodnadatta and being carried the remaining 600 kilometres by camels. We learnt about the Birdsville mailman and the challenges presented by something as simple as delivering a letter. I was so impressed by these people who were so determined to make a life in the outback and who were so devoted to their country that they worked so hard to connect it. 


But to me the biggest icon of Australian determination is the Dog proof fence. At over five thousand kilometres long, the Dingo fence is the longest fence on earth! It was built all the way back in 1885 to stop Dingos from entering pastoral land and eating sheep, and it’s been maintained until today! Now, I don’t know about you but if I were a sheep farmer and I arrived in the outback and saw all the challenges-irrigation, infertile soil, native predators- I would have given up immediately and decided to eat kangaroo instead (which totally would have been more environmentally friendly, by the way) but no-the stubborn Australian spirit decided the best option would be to hand build the longest fence on earth. I can’t even explain to you how amazing I find this simple wire fence. We saw it all the way back on the Nullarbor, again in Coober Pedy, and we will one day see it again in Queensland. I don’t think anything can define white Australian culture quite the way the Dingo fence does. 


So with all of that said, I love the outback. I love it because it connects me to what it means to be an Australian. I don’t think I will ever consider myself fully Australian, but having experienced the outback I feel like I understand Australian patriotism, the sense of adventure and fearlessness, and the love of the land that drives people to live in the craziest of environments. 

Should you visit the Eyre Peninsula?

Many people that we met along the Nullarbor were planning on driving right past the Eyre peninsula and making a bee line for Adelaide. One couple that we met informed us that there was less to do on the peninsula than there was on the Nullarbor. We decided we would go experience it and make that judgement for ourselves.

We had an awesome time there and here’s why….

Crazy coastline

Í don’t know if we’ve ever been somewhere that has a sculpture park along the Cliffside, but it was a pretty cool experience! It’s just one example of the diverse coastline you’ll find here on the Eyre peninsula.

Eyre Peninsula our migration patterns

Cliffside sculptures in Elliston

 

Eyre Peninusla our migration patterns

Wild waves in Coffin bay

National parks

There are two beautiful national parks on the Eyre peninsula- Coffin Bay, and Lincoln national park. They both contain beachside camping, awesome fishing, hiking, wildlife, and picturesque vistas. Coffin bay also has plenty of tracks for four wheel drive enthusiasts!

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Skipping rocks in Lincoln national park

Eyre Peninsula our migration patterns

Sunset at Yangie bay lookout, Coffin bay

 

food

Coffin bay is known for its oyster so its certainly worth visiting if you’re a seafood lover. Port Lincoln is home to our favourite bakery of the trip (and we have tried a fair few)- Hage’s bakery. Try their donut of the week.

Our migration patterns eyre peninsula

First breakfast out of the trip at The Rogue and Rascal cafe,Port Lincoln. Did not disappoint!

wildlife

We saw so many emus and kangaroos in the national parks in the Eyre peninsula. We woke up one night to a kangaroo digging through our bin. Emus roamed freely throughout the campsite. If you’re feeling particularly eager  for a unique wildlife encounter you can go shark cage diving in Port Lincoln.

our migration patterns eyre peninsula

Emus in Coffin bay

history

We were surprised to find that there is a wealth of history throughout the Eyre peninsula. There are many memorials for the “founder of south Australia”, Matthew Flinders. The tale of his explorations are woven through the peninsula, in the names of features (such as Point Avoid) and in the landscape itself (such as the areas of land he cleared to try to farm).

eyre peninsula our migration patterns

A memorial to Matthew Flinders atop Stamford Hill

 

hiking

There are great hiking networks throughout the  peninsula, including the investigator trail which is an 89 kilometre trail following Matthew Flinders’ original exploration. Lincoln national park contains one of Australia’s top 40 great walks- the Stamford Hill hike. It’s a relatively easy walk with stunning views at the summit.

eyre peninsula our migration patterns

The view from the top

community

One of the most awesome things in the Eyre peninsula was the amount of volunteers who gave up their time for their community. From the volunteer run book store in Port Lincoln to the blacksmith museum in Tumby Bay whose volunteers couldn’t have been more accommodating. It’s amazing that there are so many people willing to invest their time to preserve the history of their communities. It certainly made the Eyre peninsula somewhere that we will always remember.

our migration patterns eyre peninsula

Fitzgerald Bay campsite

 

 

 

Guide to Australia’s Great Southern Region

Experience the great southern on a budget

Our first week of travel has been filled with adventure, hiking, and, unfortunately, a lot of rain. It’s currently the height of summer in Australia but as I write this I’m hiding in the car from the rain and wind. We’ve been trying to make the best of our time in the Great Southern region because, despite the weather, this really is a beautiful part of Western Australia. With a stunning coastline, hikes of all assortment and dozens of four wheel drive tracks, this region truly caters towards the adventurous spirit. We’ve kept this article as a list of free attractions in the Great Southern-perfect for the budget backpacker- but some of the national parks do have entry fees. I thought I’d include them anyway because so many travelers buy national park passes.

 

Walpole

Our first stop on our big adventure was D’entrecastreux national park near the town of Walpole. The majority of this park is accessible by four wheel drive only, and the few two wheel drive roads are unsealed, which may be something to consider when driving a rental car! However, when you do get into the park you’ll be greeted by a seriously beautiful and almost untouched coastline. The park is actually quite big and has several entrances. We saw a small portion of it, but we loved it all.

Mandalay beach was a highlight of our time here. From the soft white sand to the visible remains of a shipwreck it definitely scores highly on our list of favourite beaches. There are some cool rock formations here and an island off the shore. We even found a small animal skull! The beach is two wheel drive accessible but it is a gravel road, and quite a corrugated one. We were surprised to find that our beer hadn’t shattered.

Great Southern

Beautiful Mandalay Beach

We also took a four wheel track drive to long point. This was actually a much longer track than we had anticipated, but it did offer great views of the surrounding beaches. There also seemed to be some hiking trails, and there were some other driving tracks branching off from the main “road.”

Great Southern

Enjoying the view

I think our favourite spot in the walpole area was the Conspicuous Cliffs. They might sound like something from a Lemony Snickett novel, but these cliffs are a spectacular coastal feature. There are multiple look out points as well as beach access. It was incredibly windy at the look out points! You can also hike part of the bibbulmun track here, so it’s a really good spot for a day trip.

Great Southern

A blustery day at the cliffs!

Denmark

 

Denmark is only about an hour South of Walpole and it’s a really awesome town. There are tonnes of great attractions around here, including a meadery, “chocolate lounge”, and wineries. I have to admit, one of the highlights of Denmark for us was the bakery. It has a whole host of awards to its name and some very interesting options. Alex had a curried kangaroo pie- dubbed the “vindaroo”. It’s a great spot for a budget lunch!

Great Southern

Fishing in Parry beach

The other great thing about Denmark is Parry’s beach campground. For $15 per site per night this place offers showers, flush toilets, huge sites, and you can have camp fires even in Summer! Best of all it’s right by the beach and it’s part of the bibulmun track. We spent a few days here and we really enjoyed it. One day we walked all the way to Elephant rocks from here. It was about an 18 kilometre round trip and took us a little under three hours each way, but it was such a cool hike. We had miles of beach entirely to ourselves, saw some wildlife, and we felt pretty accomplished when we reached the pristine beach of Green’s pool and Elephant rocks. We also accidentally fell asleep on the beach on the way home, but that’s not important 😉

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Elephant rocks-worth the walk!

Denmark itself is larger than I expected and is situated very prettily on the Denmark river. It seems to be quite geared towards tourists and has lots of interesting shops worth wandering around. My favourites were the Australian Alpaca Centre- a alpaca wool clothing store- and Third Stone Traders, a fair trade and local craft store. The town is definitely worth exploring even if you’re just window shopping.

Great Southern

Street Art in Denmark

Albany

 

If you’re like me you probably had no idea that Albany was once destined to become the capital of Western Australia. It’s the oldest city is the state and has the rich history to prove it. There’s quite a few museums here but I’ll just focus on the free things for now.

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Albany was beautiful once the sun came out!

First of all there’s cosy corner campground- a totally free campground with drop toilets and beach access. It’s about fifteen minutes outside of Albany and, while basic, it’s pretty awesome for a free spot! We stayed there for a few nights and while the weather wasn’t good enough to really enjoy its proximity to the beach, it was still great to have somewhere free to spend some time.

 

Albany itself has a free museum which offers a pretty comprehensive overview of Albany’s history. I have to admit I had no idea there was so much learn about the city’s past. We really only visited the museum because we both wanted to use the public toilets there, but it has great colourful exhibits and the friendly staff gave us great ideas for how to spend the rest of our time.

 

One of the coolest attractions in Albany is The Gap. This is area of rugged coastline where a viewing platform has been built over a gap in the cliffs. From here you can watch the waves wooshing beneath you. It’s pretty wild and might be one to avoid if you’re afraid of heights! The view is great though and the water is a gorgeous colour as it splashes against the rocks. It’s also right by the natural bridge and the blowholes- we brought a picnic and made an afternoon of seeing the sights!

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The Wild Waters of The Gap

About an hour outside Albany you’ll find the Stirling Ranges which contain the biggest mountain in the Southern half of WA- Bluff Knoll. We climbed the mountain one blustery day and it was a great experience. It was definitely tough, especially with the wild weather near the summit, but we got some great views, got some good fresh air and exercise, and enjoyed our first real physical challenge of the trip!

Great Southern

Bluff Knoll-doesn’t it look like something from a fantasy film?

As a result of the crazy rain we’ve had over the past week some sections of the trail were pretty water logged. It was cool to be able to fill our water bottles at the waterfalls though!

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The freshest water imaginable!

So that’s our guide to the free attractions of the Great Southern! Our plan was to move on to Esperance after a few days in Albany, but due to some crazy flooding and road closures we’re not sure when we’ll make it there. For now we’re hanging out at Shelley’s beach campground, just down the road from Cosy Corner. This site isn’t free-it’s 7.50 per person per night- but we love the crystal clear water here and it’s quite sheltered from the wind. We’re not quite sure what we’ll do next, so be sure to follow us on facebook, instagram and twitter to keep up to date. You can also sign up to our newsletter in the sidebar. Happy travelling!

our migration patterns

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Buying a car in Australia

If you’re planning on traveling in Australia for anymore than a month or two it might be most cost effective for you to buy a vehicle instead of renting. Camper van rental prices in Australia are very high, particularly if you’re travelling one way. When we started to look at the cost of renting a campervan for a few months we quickly realized it would make more sense to just buy one. So that’s what we did!
There’s a whole host of backpacker vehicles out there, from vans to four wheel drives to sedans. But the process of buying a car in a new country can be a bit daunting! So here are our top tips for buying a car in Australia.


Gumtree is your best friend

Gumtree is a nationwide buy and sell website. Just search for backpacker cars and you’ll find a huge amount of cars kitted out for travel. People often sell their cars with stoves, tents, camping chairs and lots of other travel accessories included. Our four wheel drive came with a roof rack, Jerry cans, a stove, camping chairs and lots of cooking equipment. The price of backpacker cars varies, with vans and 4x4s costing a fair bit more than station wagons. Our 1997 Pajero cost us $3,500.

Buying a car in Australia

Our 4×4 already had a bed in the back!

Registration is important

Registration (or rego as it’s unaffectionately called) is what legally allows you drive on the road. It’s a fee you pay every 3,6, or 12 months that includes third party insurance. If a car’s rego expires and isn’t renewed within a certain frame of time it needs to undergo a safety inspection to be re-registered. These safety inspections tend to be very strict and for this reason buying an unregistered car is a pretty big risk-you have no idea how many things you’ll need to fix! Because of this unregistered cars sell for just a few hundred dollars.

Buying a car in Australia

There’s nothing like the open road!

Registration varies from state to state

Unfortunately, registration is not a nationwide program. Each state has its own rules and regulations about registration. This can be annoying for travellers driving one way-trying to sell a car that’s been registered in a different state can be difficult! That’s because if someone wants to re-register if in that state they will usually need to get it inspected.

When we bought our Mitsubishi Pajero it was registered in the state of Victoria. We could have transferred the Victorian rego into our names but we would need to have a Victorian license number to put on the forms. The other option was to visit a Victorian department of transport in person and register it there. Because we weren’t travelling for a while we decided to just re-register it to the state of Western Australia.

Buying a car in Australia

To register the car in our state we needed to undergo a safety inspection. This didn’t bother us much as we’ll be travelling for a year and we don’t want to have any major problems with the car anyway! It is a bit expensive though, as each inspection costs around $80. We failed the first inspection because of a few small issues but passed the second one with flying colours 😉 we then got new license plates and paid the registration fee for 12 months. The cost of registration varies based on your car and state-WA is apparently the cheapest state and has the added bonus of being able to renew your rego online. Some states require you to undergo yearly safety inspections. Read more about each state’s requirements in the links below.

Western Australia

Victoria

New South Wales

South Australia

Tasmania

Northern Territory

ACT

Ask the right questions

Obviously no matter where you are in the world it’s important to ask the right questions when you buy a car. Ask to see the service history, ask what issues the previous owners had, ask what the fuel economy is like. Check what kind of thread the tyres have-especially if you’re travelling for a short time, tyres are an expensive thing to replace! If you’ll be travelling to hot desert areas it’s important to ask if the engine has issues with overheating. When you test drive the car check the windscreen wipers, cruise control, and listen for any unusual noises.

What to do once you’ve bought your car!

Once you’ve bought your car you have two weeks to transfer the registration from the previous owner’s name to yours. You can download the registration transfer forms from the relevant state’s website or visit the department of transport and register there. Once you’ve registered you have nothing else to worry about! Just be sure to renew your rego before it expires!

Be aware of the local driving laws- speed limits can differ from state to state! Try not to drive late at night in rural areas as you run a serious risk of hitting a kangaroo or other wildlife, which can seriously damage your car. Remember that by taking care of your car you increase your chance of selling it. I’ve heard of travelers reselling their cars for a profit at the end of their trips!

Have you ever bought a car in a foreign country? What was your experience? Be sure to let us know in the comments!

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Why we’ve Chosen Domestic Travel

As we look forward to our year long trip around Australia I thought we’d share some of the reasons we decided to travel domestically. Domestic travel can seem unappealing for a host of reasons. People often travel to experience other cultures, and we can understand why so many people choose to avoid domestic travel. But we really believe everyone should do some domestic travel at some point in their lives! There’s a whole beautiful world out there and we want to see it all, but there’s a number of reasons for why we decided to stay in Australia.

 

No expensive flights

On most international trips your biggest singular  expense will be your international flights! Our flights from Perth to Dublin cost us $1600AUD each, and our flights to America cost even more. When you travel domestically any flights you take will be much cheaper, and you don’t necessarily need to fly at all. We’ll be doing our trip around Australia in our four wheel drive. This cost us $3,500 and will be our transportation and our accommodation for our entire trip! That’s a pretty big saving!

Domestic Travel

Jerry the Four Wheel Drive!

We’ve also got the added bonus of not having to worry about the weight of our luggage, extra airline fees, or any liquid or food restrictions. We want to travel lightly but we have a lot more room for any extra things we might need.

 

No visas

Visa applications can get complicated, costly, and stressful. I’m lucky to have a  European passport which gives me greater access to other countries, but not everyone is as lucky. If you’ve got a passport that restricts your travel in foreign countries then domestic travel is a great option! You’ll save yourself time and money.

 

No travel insurance

Travel insurance is one of those costs that people often overlook when planning a trip. Paying for something that you hope you never need can suck, but it would be awful to be in a bad situation and regret not buying it. Many countries now require you to have travel insurance upon entering. The great thing about travelling domestically is that you don’t need to get travel insurance! Your regular health insurance should cover you for any potential accidents. In Australia we have good public health care and we know that if any problems do arise we won’t find ourselves paying an insane medical bill, like we would have in America.

 

No roaming charges

Another thing you can cross off your to-do list- roaming plans. You won’t need to pay extra for a roaming plan, unlock your phone, or buy a cheap phone at your destination; because your current plan will work just fine! Now you’re obviously not going to plan your holiday around your phone plan (or maybe you do, I’m not judging!) but it’s a nice bonus that saves you money and takes one less stress off your plate.

 

Environmentally friendly

Unfortunately flying to the other side of the world has a big impact on the environment. All those miles in the air equal lots of burning fuel, and lots of burning fuel equals lots of carbon emissions! By opting to travel closer to home your travels can be that little bit greener!

 

No foreign languages

It’s great to be able to visit new countries, pick up parts of other languages and muddle your way through interacting with others. But sometimes it can be exhausting! If you’re bilingually challenged like myself the idea of learning a new language is not only daunting but potentially impossible. When you travel your own country it’s a nice break from struggling to read menus and trying to remember if “sortie” means entrance or exit!

 

 

No currency exchange/bank card issues

This is a cool one because it’s one less thing to put on your pre-travel to do list! When travelling internally you won’t need to exchange currency, get a travel card, or organise anything extra with your bank. And when you arrive at your destination you won’t spend an embarrassingly long time trying to count your cash out at the check out!

Domestic Travel

Australia is so beautiful!

See your own backyard!

We have been in Australia for a fair chunk of our lives now and we’ve still seen the tiniest portion of it! How many times have you met someone while traveling who’s seen more of your native country than you have? How many times has someone asked you for recommendations on what to see and you’ve been clueless? It’s a great thing to be able to experience and explore your own country. It can enrich your understanding of your own culture and your own environment, and it helps you to appreciate your own unique place in the world. That’s why we’ve chosen to experience domestic travel together before we add any new countries to our list!

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Meelup Reserve Trail 

Recently we walked part of the Meelup reserve trail from Meelup beach in Dunsborough to Eagle bay. This is a beautiful coastal trail leading through bush and beach. The full trail goes from Dunsborough beach to Eagle bay and is 7.4 km one way, but we chose to bite off a 3 km portion. The trail is rugged in parts and occasionally we lost the trail signs, but as long as you follow the coastline you’re bound to end up in Eagle bay eventually! This walk would be wonderful in Summer as there are lots of secluded beaches along the way where you could stop for a swim and a picnic! There are toilets at Meelup and just before you reach eagle bay. Here are some photos from our hike!

Here the trail started to ascend into the bushy cliffs overlooking the ocean. The path was rocky at times but the views were beautiful!


We had this little beach all to ourselves! I never get tired of secluded south west beaches. We definitely recommend hiking the Meelup Reserve Trail!

Pinnacles Road Trip

Recently we took a weekend road trip north of Perth as far as Jurien Bay via the Indian Ocean Drive. Neither of us had been this far north before (I know, it’s shameful. But that’s why we’re so determined to start doing more domestic travel!) First stop on the trip was Yanchep national park! This beautiful green park is home to koalas,kangaroos, and some great bush trails. Entrance is $12 per car and this covers you for any other parks you visit that day. Yanchep is full of caves and you can tour the Crystal Cave for an additional fee, though we didn’t have time this trip. 

Spot the Koala!

Our new friend Skippy

 

Bush Trail

As we continued North the surrounding area became dense with bush land. At times we could see the coast line, but not as much as you would expect from a road named the Indian Ocean drive. There are some great lookout spots along the way though. 

When we were almost halfway to Nambung national park-more widely known as the pinnacles-we saw a big sign for “The Leaning Tower of Gingin.” We decided this sounded like something worth detouring for, so we headed inland towards Gingin! The land here was interesting and it looked like there’d been recent bushfires. When we got the the tower it turned out it was so observatory with a large lopsided towers that you can drop water balloons from! It also has a great view of the surrounding bush land as far as the coast. It was $6 each to go to the top of the tower, which I think is pretty pricey but it was good fun and we enjoyed the view. 

The view from the tower

 

Finally we reached the Pinnacles! I’ve wanted to visit here for a very long time, and it didn’t let me down. The landscape here is incredibly cool. The oddly shaped limestone pinnacles rise from the plains of yellow sand in a way that seems almost alien. This desert terrain could easily feature in a sci fi movie or be the latest image from a Mars drone. It was a surreal experience to feel as if we were stepping into a foreign world, and it was certainly a fun adventure. We did both the pinnacles drive (suitable for two wheel drive cars) and the walk, which was a short 1.5 km loop. I definitely recommend doing the walk as the you get a much better feel for the place when you get out of your car and experience the desert up close. 

The Pinnacles Desert


That night we stayed in the Pinnacles holiday park. It was $30 for the night in an unpowered campsite. The location is good and right by the beach. Our plan was to head to Jurien bay in the morning and get breakfast on the jetty, but unfortunately we woke up to some torrential rain! So after taking down our tent in record breaking time we began making our way South to Lancelin. By the time we got here the rain had stopped for just long enough for us to climb up the Lancelin sand dunes. This towering inland dune system makes you feel as if you’re in Egypt, and it would be a great place to visit with a four wheel drive! We had a delicious budget breakfast at the Lancelin bakery and then drove back to Perth where we spent the rest of the afternoon. This trip made for a great weekend and would also be a good day trip from Perth if you’re able to squeeze things in!

The Sand Dunes

Walpole- Giants, long drives and not so mountainous mountains

As part of our resolution to see more of beautiful Western Australia we decided to spend Easter Monday discovering some of Walpole. I have never been before and Alex has only seen a small part of it. Walpole is part of the Great Southern region of WA and is home to many forests, national parks and a beautiful coastline (though most of the coast is accessible only via four wheel drive). The drive to Walpole from Bunbury is 3-3.5 hours and passes through several small towns, many of which seemed like they’d be worth visiting on a more leisurely weekend trip. But this was a day trip and we had lots of things to see! We were unusually prepared and had a picnic packed the night before and were able to leave the house by 7 am! My little sister Molly joined us on this trip too. 
 

Walpole’s beautiful forests

 

Our first stop on the drive was Diamond tree between Manjimup and Walpole off the South western highway. It’s well sign posted so it’s hard to miss. This is part of a network of trees which were historically used to spot bushfires in the area. The Diamond tree is 52 metres high and you can climb to the cabin on the top via metal spikes inserted in the tree trunk. Neither me or Alex were quite able to reach the top but fortunately Molly could be our Guinea pig and she got there and took some photos for us! Upon reaching the bottom she asked “can I go again?” 

 

Molly and Alex ascending the Diamond Tree

 
The diamond tree also has a short 400 metre loop trail that points out some local flora and has some more little trees to climb. There are also flush toilets, so it’s a really luxurious spot! 😉

 

The view from the top

 
After the Diamond Tree we went directly to Walpole’s Tree Top walk in the Valley of the Giants. This is a 40 metre high walkway among a forest of giant tingle trees. There is a fee for entrance-$19 per adult and $9.50 per child. (Families can avail of the family pass for $47.50) The walk is wheel chair friendly and is 600 metres round trip. Walking through the canopy of trees from this height was very cool and offered a different perspective on the Forrest. Afterwards you can do a ground walk called the Ancient Empire walk and the different view the two walks provided was a cool comparison. It is worth noting that the walk way does shake and wobble and one lady had to get off as it made her feel dizzy. Over all the treetop walk was pretty cool and definitely worth visiting but I personally felt it was a tad overpriced for such a short walk. 

 

Walking amongst the giants

 
From the Valley of the Giants we made our way to Mount Frankland. This granite peak is located in amount Frankland national park. The parks has many entrances so it can be confusing to figure out the way to go, but the best access point isn’t via the park at all- it’s down North Walpole road off the South Westen highway. The last section of this road is unsealed but is accessible to two wheel drives-though I probably wouldn’t drive it in a Porsche! 

 

The Ancient Empire walk

 The hike to the top of Mount Frankland is relatively short at just 600 metres each way, but it contains over 300 steep steps and a ladder. The steps were a bit exhausting especially in the warm weather, but I would think that most people with a moderate level of fitness could do this hike in under an hour. The view from the top is beautiful- miles of forest and bush land , the ocean in the distance, and the surrounding mountains such as bluff knoll and mount Roe. As usual the hike was insignificant to Molly and her boundless energy. “That wasn’t a real mountain.” I think she was expecting ice picks and a 90 degree drop! I really enjoyed this hike and I think it’s definitely worth doing if you’re in the area. I found it more enjoyable than the treetop walk. 

 

The view from Mt Frankland

 
I was seriously impressed with all that Walpole had to offer. There are so many national parks and reserves in the area. I really hope that next time we visit we can take the whole weekend, and maybe even rent a four wheel drive to explore the beautiful coast line. 

We made it!

Hello there!

Welcome to my travel blog! My name is Ciara and my boyfriend up there is Alex. He’s American, I’m Irish, and we live together in the South West of Australia! Life down under can seem like a constant holiday, but we still love going to new places, trying new food, and exploring the roads less travelled. So far we’ve seen a small chunk of the world on a minimum wage budget, and here you’ll find our stories, tips and a million reasons for why you should try out some migration patterns of your own 🙂